A Cuban individual

A Cuban individual One group that is getting extra attention in this war of propaganda is rappers, as hip hop has long played a central role in the cultural political imagination of Cuba. Last month, Havana rapper Denis Solís was arrested by Cuban police for “insulting an officer.” Soon after, an artist and activist group he belongs to called the San Isidro Movement mobilized an occupation of a public square and went on a hunger strike to demand his release. Videos of the subsequent crackdown by the Cuban authorities went viral, and hundreds came out in the following days to protest the heavy-handed treatment. The protests fizzled out after stalled negotiations with the government, but the damage to the government’s public image had already been done.

22.12.2020 | by Luna Olavarría Gallegos and Boima Tucker

'I'm Just Trying to Photograph Life as I See It.' Earlie Hudnall Jr. Has Spent More Than 40 Years Documenting Historically Black Neighborhoods in Houston

'I'm Just Trying to Photograph Life as I See It.' Earlie Hudnall Jr. Has Spent More Than 40 Years Documenting Historically Black Neighborhoods in Houston Hudnall records for posterity the architecture of weathered shotgun houses and the vibrant lives within them. He depicts people at ease, celebrating holidays, dressed in their Sunday finery, and kids in the thrall of summertime. “These are the young Floyds coming up,” he says. “They need to be cared for and guided. Rather than holding up a sign and marching for a day or two, then forgetting about it, come here, talk to people, get to know them.”

14.12.2020 | by Earlie Hudnall and Paul Moakley

Decolonization in, of and through the archival “moving images” of artistic practice

Decolonization in, of and through the archival “moving images” of artistic practice This essay investigates the ways in which contemporary artistic practices have been working towards an epistemic and ethico-political decolonization of the present by means of critical examinations of several sorts of colonial archives, whether public or private, familial or anonymous. Through the lens of specific artworks by the artists Ângela Ferreira, Kiluanji Kia Henda, Délio Jasse, Daniel Barroca and Raquel Schefer, this essay examines the extent to which the aesthetics of these video, photographic and sculptural practices puts forth a politics and ethics of history and memory relevant to thinking critically about the colonial amnesias and imperial nostalgias which still pervade a post-colonial condition marked by neo-colonial patterns of globalization and by uneasy relationships with diasporic and migrant communities.

06.12.2020 | by Ana Balona de Oliveira

Notes on Curatorship, Cultural Programming and Coloniality in Portugal

Notes on Curatorship, Cultural Programming and Coloniality in Portugal This article examines the impact of contemporary curating and cultural programming in the configuration of critical perspectives on Portugal’s postcolonial identity. It argues that visual creativity is forging a new paradigm in the Portuguese cultural field. In this context, postcolonial discourses are not silenced but, rather, aligned with international agendas in broader cultural initiatives mirroring the transformation of the main Portuguese cities into cosmopolitan, multicultural, and multiethnic enclaves.

01.12.2020 | by Marta Lança and Carlos Garrido Castellano

In Portugal, Asian workers pick fruit and live precariously

In Portugal, Asian workers pick fruit and live precariously As night falls on São Teotónio, the lights are still on at the school. Three times a week, it stays open until midnight to hold classes for adults from the region, who come here at the end of a long day in the greenhouses – knowing they will need to speak some Portuguese in order to qualify for permanent residency. There are currently 500 adult students registered for night classes – almost matching the daytime intake of 600 children. Moldovan Vitali Siminionov, who picks flowers for a living, and whose two children both study at the school, joked: “They’re always correcting me saying ‘Dad, that’s not how you say it!”

24.11.2020 | by Ana Naomi de Sousa

Investing in a Feminist Peace

Investing in a Feminist Peace On March 23, at the outset of the pandemic, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres called for a global ceasefire, in order to enable countries to focus on the COVID-19 crisis and allow humanitarian organizations to reach vulnerable populations. More than 100 women’s organizations from Iraq, Libya, Palestine, Syria, and Yemen quickly joined the appeal with a joint statement advocating a broad COVID-19 truce, which could form the basis for a lasting peace. It should come as no surprise that women were among the first to support the call for a ceasefire.

18.11.2020 | by Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka

Caribbean Workers and Capitalist Geography: An interview with Marion Werner

Caribbean Workers and Capitalist Geography: An interview with Marion Werner A Radical Journal of Geography, Global Displacements is a rigorous and trenchantly argued examination of the impact of the global organization of capitalist accumulation and exploitation on the life and labor of Haitian and Dominican people. Focusing on the garment industry, Werner looks at the circulation of capital and labor under neoliberalism, paying close attention to questions of geography, race, and gender. A critical, Caribbeanist intervention into geographic and political-economic research, Global Displacements will stand as a classic work of Caribbean studies.

12.11.2020 | by The Public Archive and Marion Werner

Louisiana Unsettled

Louisiana Unsettled What if we accounted for all labor that was put in the development of those lands, both human, and non-human, the living, the inert, and the not-yet-lived, would this then lead us to a new understanding of its environment and its constitution as a disappearing geological strata in flux? Can we interpret how the energetic metabolism speculated around the Mississippi is withholding processes of land recuperation and human health, while privileging forms of dissolved property?

27.11.2019 | by Margarida Mendes

New navigators of Portuguese cultural memory

New navigators of Portuguese cultural memory I imagine these as the “new navigators”, appropriating this controversial term to describe them in part because of their fearlessness, or perhaps more accurately their braving fear, in dis-covering, in the sense of recovering and uncovering, monstrous aspects of the past as a way to make sense of monstrous aspects of the present.

13.10.2019 | by Sharon Lubkemann Allen

To use the word WE as oppose to I is almost a revolutionary act at the moment.

To use the word WE as oppose to I is almost a revolutionary act at the moment. OUR SURVIVAL is at stake and the conditions and circumstances that are at our side are not just enough not enough and we have in a manner of ways been seeing this expressed in a diverse way on any given day on any given TV channel. There is an overall tension an almost thick layer of distrust, miscommunication, doubt, an insecurity that not only is taking place in the parliament of her magesty the queen but everywhere we consider to be touched by western values or whatever is left of them, such as Hong Kong is showing.

11.10.2019 | by Adin Manuel

The memory and history inscribed in the genetic technologies of fighting crime

The memory and history inscribed in the genetic technologies of fighting crime The mission of the EXCHANGE project (2015-2020) (2) is to reflect critically on the perpetuation of the “European dream” of a community of solidarity in which national, linguistic and cultural differences are overcome to produce a space in which citizens can move freely and safely. The surveillance technologies that the project studies have a shared feature: they are genetic machineries that seek to identify individuals for the purposes of criminal prosecution.

07.09.2019 | by Sheila Khan and Helena Machado

The Sudanese Revolution: The Third and Last?

The Sudanese Revolution: The Third and Last? the so-called “international community”, which dedicated to the events in Sudan not even one-tenth of the attention given to the Venezuelan or Algerian crises, was awakened by the rumble of the fall of the dictator of Khartoum. It was as if Western, Arab and African governments understood suddenly that a democratic revolution in Sudan may have devastating effects on the stability of neighbouring countries and on the regional balance of power, entailing feverish political and diplomatic agitation.

15.07.2019 | by Nicole Guardiola

Strength and power: reimagining revolution

Strength and power: reimagining revolution Politics isn’t, first and foremost, a matter of making allegations and raising awareness; there is no one straw that breaks the camel’s back, and what’s bad can be tolerated indefinitely. Instead, it is a sort of shedding of the skin, by which we become sensitive to this or allergic to that. Nor has it much to do with convincing (discourse), or seducing (marketing), but rather with opening all sorts of spaces to experience another way of living, another definition of reality, another vision of the world. In the struggle for hegemony, the skin – yours, mine, everyone’s – is the battlefield. JEUX SANS FRONTIÈRES #2

11.02.2018 | by Amador Fernández-Savater

What can't be reduced to abstract “masses”

What can't be reduced to abstract “masses” Lots of people are beginning to think about politics, learning how to think about the city, relations and institutions. There are people from all over the place, from universities, associations and schools. And the Government is feeling it, they fear our advances. But to say that popular uprisings in Brazil are brainless and devoid of focus is simplistic, because everything is focus. JEUX SANS FRONTIÈRES #2

09.04.2016 | by

Social Protests in Morocco and the So-Called “Arab” “Spring”

Social Protests in Morocco and the So-Called “Arab” “Spring” In Morocco, unlike other countries, despite the enormous popular support for the protests, which took place simultaneously in several cities on February 20, 2011, and that re-occurred sometimes on a weekly basis during that year, there were no calls (with some timid exceptions) based on the famous slogan “the people want the fall of the regime.” This would become a somewhat taboo slogan, either for fear of jeopardizing the monarchical regime, whose legitimacy is presented as being unquestionable, or by an apparently sincere devotion of a significant portion of the population towards the Moroccan monarchy. JSF#2

28.03.2016 | by Hugo Maia

Mare Nostrum

Mare Nostrum i would not be i would not be had i not not i i too but not even at all if. i would not be only not i i too i would not be. i am because. i am i too i because if. i would not be if my mother had not met my father i naturally by the nature of things would not be i would not be.

18.03.2016 | by Miriam Cahn

Games without Borders #2 - Editorial

Games without Borders #2 - Editorial People are fighting today against growing poverty, against mutating forms of capitalist exploitation disguised and administered under the label of “austerity politics” in Europe and elsewhere. But to resist – r/esistere in a somewhat fictional etymology – also means to invent new modes of existence. To invent is not to create something out of nothing, but to aggregate forces that were already present – the invention in this sense is a recomposition of forces. MAGAZINE JSF#2

08.03.2016 | by Sandra Lang

The Culture of Coloniality

The Culture of Coloniality Decolonising a cultural institution does not just mean considering the matter and organising exhibitions and seminars. In the current context, decolonising a museum requires a constant effort to take a position in regard to the migratory control system; it requires accepting that it is impossible to continue programming activities and events while there is a total normalisation of the existence of Migrant Detention Centres, forced deportation flights on a mass and individual scale, individuals with semi-rights and anti-rights, and situations of extreme violence in border zones which are the local contexts where these projects are presented. Decolonizing Museums, L'Internationale Online Issue 2, September 2015.

27.02.2016 | by Daniela Ortiz

It's a knockout!

It's a knockout! The subtitle of this issue works both ways: practices of resistance and spaces of invention, practices of invention and spaces of resistance. Even if we think in terms of productive power relations, we still use the word “resistance” in reference to those practices and spaces that emerge in moments of antagonist tension: e.g., when measures imposed by governmental institutions and the lack of perspectives for the future are individually and collectively felt as being oppressive.

29.10.2015 | by vários

Games without Borders - on the magazine as a ‘zone of resistance/practice of invention’

Games without Borders -  on the magazine as a ‘zone of resistance/practice of invention’ Is imperative to not look at recent events in a epiphenomenal way, focusing exclusively on the squares themselves, as if these events were “irrational”, came out of nowhere and went back to noplace (the very name “Arab Spring” seems to imply that the Spring is outside the historical time). We should instead try to understand them in continuity, alongside a myriad of encounters, practices, actions – that we call ’zones of resistance and practices of invention’.

04.10.2013 | by Ana Bigotte Vieira