The creole as a strategy of development

The creole as a strategy of development The creole, as a language, arose from the communication needs of colonized societies with the colonizer regime, being the language of national unity in many countries. Considering their own mother tongues as little useful, colonized societies recurred to the linguistic knowledge of the imposed model to build a simpler form of vehicular language, which we nowadays call creole.

To read

23.08.2012 | by Catarina Laranjeiro and Jorge Filipe

"Virgem Margarida", the insurgent spirit of women

"Virgem Margarida", the  insurgent spirit of women This spurs the women to defiantly band together to undertake a real revolutionary action and assert their independence from their "liberators." An evocative exposé of a little-known chapter in the contemporary history of Mozambique, Virgin Margarida is a dramatic and inspiring elegy to the insurgent spirit of women across nations, histories and cultures.

Afroscreen

22.08.2012 | by vários

Bonga “I help to place Angola in the world”

Bonga  “I help to place Angola in the world” He makes Angolan music for 40 years, has nearly 500 musical themes recorded and “many miles on the road”. Bonga, whose voice identifies with Angola, has always been attentive to the reality of his country, preserving and disseminating the Semba musical style. He is keen to highlight: “Just like Brazil has Samba and America has Rock, Angola has Semba. It is the music I heard in the cradle”. His musical path was marked by his respect to “origin, tradition and pulse of the Semba”, taking it and spreading it around the world.

Stages

23.07.2012 | by Marta Lança

Sérgio Afonso The boy with the camera and the camcorder

Sérgio Afonso The boy with the camera and the camcorder And he answers that the production company that he is part of, Generation 80, was born under a very good star: “there is a crisis in the world, money is for some people ever more difficult to get, but technology is also more at hand for everybody. There are advantages in these days of bureaucracies and problems getting a foot in the door – you don’t need an investment of millions to work in this field and to make a film with a camcorder.”

Face to face

23.07.2012 | by Marta Lança

AFRICAN MUSIC IS GOING TO GET AN EVER HIGHER INTRNATIONAL PROFILE

AFRICAN MUSIC IS GOING TO GET AN EVER HIGHER INTRNATIONAL PROFILE He paid a visit to studios in the musseques (local neighbourhoods), he had talks with producers to give support for his Akwaaba Music, a digital platform dedicated to African music and pop culture, providing visibility for quality people in music who don’t have the structure needed to go far in the business. In the last 3 years, Lebrave has produced works with more than 70 artists from 15 African countries and has been working on the development of a global network covering the production of contents, digital distribution, marketing and licensing.

Face to face

23.07.2012 | by Marta Lança

Occupy Wall Street: Carnival Against Capital? Carnivalesque as Protest Sensibility

Occupy Wall Street: Carnival Against Capital? Carnivalesque as Protest Sensibility While some commentators and journalists have dismissed Occupy Wall Street as carnival, lawmakers and police officers did not miss the point. They reached back to a mid-nineteenth century ban on masking to arrest occupiers wearing as little as a folded bandana on the forehead, leaving little doubt about their fear of Carnival as a potent form of political protest. New York Times journalist Ginia Bellafante initially expressed skepticism about 'air[ing] societal grievance as carnival,' but just a few days later she warned against 'criminalizing costume,' thus changing her condescension to caution as she confirmed the police’s point: masking can be dangerous, Carnival is serious business.

Stages

21.07.2012 | by Claire Tancons

Crossing Music's Borders: 'I Hate World Music'

Crossing Music's Borders: 'I Hate World Music' I hate world music. That's probably one of the perverse reasons I have been asked to write about it. The term is a catchall that commonly refers to non-Western music of any and all sorts, popular music, traditional music and even classical music. It's a marketing as well as a pseudomusical term — and a name for a bin in the record store signifying stuff that doesn't belong anywhere else in the store.

Mukanda

20.07.2012 | by David Byrne

From Africa to Buenos Aires – At the Forefront of a New Migratory Nexus?

From Africa to Buenos Aires – At the Forefront of a New Migratory Nexus? It’s Friday afternoon at the Al-Ahmad mosque in lower Buenos Aires. Despite gathering here with their multicultural brethren for prayer service, the small group of African men walking out the door is part of an inchoate community that has become a bit of a talking point in this vast and diverse metropolis.

To read

08.06.2012 | by Pedro F Marcelino

The balance of the perfect "Batida"

The balance of the perfect "Batida" We are at the Batida workshop. A space in a garages complex in Lisbon. On the outside it’s just that. A building with nothing that distinguishes it from the others. Inside there is Pedro Coquenão, or DJ Mpula, or the man who invented Batida. Inside there, this 37-year-old Portuguese man born in Huambo (Angola), which he left with the onset of civil war, an Angolan living in Portugal since then, talks non-stop about all that Batida means. We could even say that we do not need to hear everything he is saying. The speakers release South African music. Scattered throughout the space we see a marimba, extemporary drums took out from diesel cans, Angolan beer “Cuca” bars, photos of Coquenão’s travels to Luanda, and drums that, in concert, will be illuminated from the inside as efficient do-it-yourself scenery. All this is Batida.

Stages

04.06.2012 | by

Angolanidade revisited – Kuduro

Angolanidade revisited – Kuduro This article explores the role of Kuduro, the popular Angolan electronic music and dance style in the process of updating the national Angolan identity called angolanidade to the conditions of the new millennium.

Stages

27.05.2012 | by Nadine Siegert and Stefanie Alisch

Photographic Heritage: Who Owns the Memories of "Before"?

Photographic Heritage: Who Owns the Memories of "Before"? All over Africa there is a certain revival of an industry of culture and memory, or perhaps even the cult of memory. And perhaps that's good news.

Afroscreen

15.05.2012 | by Pedro F Marcelino

Right After the Comma

Right After the Comma You will find here the account of a series of journeys which I began in August 2010. You will also find in the text and drawings of Right After the Comma other earlier and later journeys which are not restricted by it and which will orbit and “de-temporalise” its central course.

To read

07.05.2012 | by Mattia Denisse

Yonamine, from Luanda to the world

Yonamine, from Luanda to the world Yonamine is very spontaneous in his work: he thinks about pictures or objects, old photographs, cigarettes packs, or curious textures, then follows their trail to create, to subvert certain applications and to give them other semiotic readings, by reinventing the fragments of different memories in a register of composed intelligibility. Conflict and unpredictability abound in his work and it’s this not classifiable side that troubles, in a good way, who watches it. You can immediately feel the urgency, and this may come largely from living in Angola.

Face to face

14.04.2012 | by Marta Lança

Black archetypes and stereotypes in brazilian films

Black archetypes and stereotypes in brazilian films A frequent charge made about Brazilian cinema by Black intellectuals and artists is that the films do not present truly individualized characters, but rather mere archetypes and/or caricatures. The accusation is pertinent, since Brazilian cinema generally favors character-types, schematic or symbolic, Black or not. In Black folklore in Brazil (1935), anthropologist Artur Ramos observed that orishas (African deities) “passed into Brazilian folklore and maintain close contact with the popular imagination, a magical and somewhat familiar contact, since they survive as symbols of individual complexes”. They appear as much in ancestral African religions (Candomblé), as in the Brazilian religion Umbanda, which absorbed other influences (e.g., indigenous, oriental).

Afroscreen

24.03.2012 | by João Carlos Rodrigues

The Queen of Choreography: Neliswe Xaba

The Queen of Choreography: Neliswe Xaba South Africa´s theatre gains international recognition for its performance arts productions due to applying diverse aesthetics and the search of new stage approaches by many different artists. In addition, regularly scheduled national and international dance, performance art and theater festivals are organized like Invecting the City in Cape Town, Dance Umbrella in Johannesburg, and National Arts Festival in Grahams Town etc.

Stages

07.03.2012 | by Grit Köppen