Musala, worf

Musala, worf Or about this faraway socialist family whose stench of betrayal sullies our ideals. Make yourself, with all the others, into a mass of militant workers. Neurotics. Gentrified. You’ve got to walk down the white stripes that cross the Open Space of shuttered hives glistening in the sun: elbowing to keep your place, emphasizing your success to excess. The law of the jungle is the strongest survive.

Mukanda

27.04.2019 | by Joëlle Sambi

Julieta

Julieta "It had its difficulties of course. There weren't many toy makers in Portugal around that time to start with. Nor were toys of any importance. Just a toy... Which is not the case for me. They all have names, stories. Now I do the job I love every day. I am happy because I do the thing, I love every day. No pressure, no orders and I see happy faces every day. The people that walk in through these doors are special. Cause they know toys are more than just plastic.

Face to face

22.04.2019 | by Sinem Taş

Ela

Ela My grandmother's name was Hayriye. It means 'to be full of goodness, kindness’. People live by their name. Grandma truly did. Maybe she wasn't able to shine in on her own life, but she became the flicker that ignited the candle which became the light for different people.

Face to face

10.04.2019 | by Sinem Taş

The Valley of the Fallen in 21st century Spain

The Valley of the Fallen in 21st century Spain The fact that Franco is buried in sacred land, the Basilica, and his family’s decision to bring the body to Madrid’s Cathedral if he is exhumed from the Valley, a measure they bluntly oppose, has prompted the Government to search unsuccessfully for complicity in the Vatican, scaling up the controversy to a diplomatic realm. The fate of Franco’s body, still today in the Valley, has transformed into a formidable political and memorial arena questioning the ability of Spain’s democracy to defeat once and for all the resilient ghost of its last dictator.

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06.04.2019 | by Francisco Ferrándiz

Language Policies: Language, Power, and Citizenship

Language Policies: Language, Power, and Citizenship language embodies the resolutions and contents of its own past as much as its present and future. But language is also a social reality and thus acts as a means of practical communication and by forming subjective awareness. Apart from being one of the basic rights of all human beings (according to the Universal Declaration of Linguistic Rights), using one’s “home language” in social dealings is one of the contradictions arising in the era of globalization.

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02.04.2019 | by Inocência Mata

Scúru Fitchádu: Punk will not die while listening to funaná

Scúru Fitchádu: Punk will not die while listening to funaná One hears the intense and physical music of Scúru Fitchádu and it is perceived that it comes from the entrails, populated by a whirlwind of emotions that long people the imaginary of Marcus. Why have not they been patented before? "Every day I think about it," says the 37-year-old musician. "Why did not this come sooner if it always lived within me? Do not know. But glad it came out now. A few years ago maybe it was too soon and I did not have the same kind of answers I'm getting now.

Stages

02.04.2019 | by Vítor Belanciano

Questions of language, multiligualism e exile

Questions of language, multiligualism e exile Even more important are the studies by Lévy-Strauss; by members of the Latin American “decolonality” group such as Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Walter Mignolo and Aníbal Quijanol; by anthropologists such as Aparecida Vilaça, Yvone de Freitas Leite, Elisa Loncon Antileo and Pedro Niemeyer Cesarino; and by indigenous leaders such as Ailton Krenac. The latter both denounce the extermination of native languages and also study them, trying to record them as far as is still possible. With this intellectual investment they recover the languages’ memory and, with it, a pre-colonial cultural universe.

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30.03.2019 | by António Pinto Ribeiro

48 war portraits 48 time boms 48 elegies

48 war portraits 48 time boms 48 elegies Whether in terms of its officially ensconced denial or the radical geopolitical reformulation of Portugal after decolonization, the Colonial War remains historiographically unresolved. The experience of participation in the war is one of the most repressed and complex, but also one of the most tragic, events of Portuguese contemporary life, and it continues to resonate today.

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30.03.2019 | by Margarida Calafate Ribeiro

Cihan

Cihan     I decided to take photos when I understood that the opinions of my family made no sense anymore. But my mum wouldn't allow me, telling me "girls don't take photos". So I did it unbeknownst to her anyway. I had found a spare camera and I used to leave it at home so that my mum would think I left my camera home...

Face to face

29.03.2019 | by Sinem Taş

Seeing With Another Person’s Eyes

 Seeing With Another Person’s Eyes The work suggests that another person’s perspective, and their particular capacities, affects the inherited vision. This vision, diminished or amplified, can cloud, obscure, or deform the receiving view; but it may at the same time provoke the heir to explore the ways that their perspective belongs neither only to them, nor any longer only to the bequeather. And this question, which starts with recognising this inheritance, can also be the starting point for other visions.

To read

23.03.2019 | by Fátima da Cruz Rodrigues

METEORISATIONS Reading Amílcar Cabral’s agronomy of liberation

METEORISATIONS  Reading Amílcar Cabral’s agronomy of liberation This article reads Amílcar Cabral’s much under-studied early soil science as a body of work not dissociable from his project of liberation struggle against Portuguese colonialism in Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde. Drawing on research situated within an artistic practice, the article explores the definitions of soil and erosion that Cabral developed as an agronomist, as well as his reports on colonial land exploitation and analysis of the trade economy, to unearth his double agency as a state soil scientist and as a ‘seeder’ of African liberation.

Afroscreen

28.02.2019 | by Filipa César

Tufo dance: Cultural heritage of Mozambique

Tufo dance: Cultural heritage of Mozambique Women come together to perform Tufo wearing capulanas and bright-coloured shirts. Their faces are covered with mussiro, a type of facial cream used by Macua women. They tie head wraps and use jewellery, necklaces and bracelets for an extravagant finishing touch.

Stages

27.02.2019 | by Hélio Nguane

The angels of God are white to this day, interview with Paulina Chiziane

The angels of God are white to this day, interview with Paulina Chiziane Paulina Chiziane (Majacaze, 1955) is surely one of the most prominent figures of current Mozambican literature, and not just that. She is an essential reference for the country’s feminist movements, a woman who confronted particularly conflictual aspects of African cultures in her literary works with startling intensity, developing themes that no one else wants to hear or discuss, not in the private sphere, much less in the public or political spheres. These are silenced themes, taboos, especially painful, pending and unresolved subjects, such as the Mozambican civil war, women’s rights in polygamy and black magic.

Face to face

25.02.2019 | by Doris Wieser

On the colonial war: memories and post-memories, transmission and imagination

On the colonial war: memories and post-memories, transmission and imagination The distance between the writer and the traumatic reality about which they write determines the result of literary attempts to convey the experience of violence. Nevertheless, there are similarities between the artistic representations of memory offered by direct witnesses of events and those re-elaborated by their descendants (those we call post-memories).

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24.02.2019 | by Felipe Cammaert

European colonization of Americas killed so many it cooled Earth's climate

European colonization of Americas killed so many it cooled Earth's climate Research finds killing of native people indirectly contributed to a colder period by causing deaths of around 56 million by 1600. European colonization of the Americas resulted in the killing of so many native people that it transformed the environment and caused the Earth’s climate to cool down, new research has found. Settlers killed off huge numbers of people in conflicts and also by spreading disease, which reduced the indigenous population by 90% in the century following Christopher Columbus’s initial journey to the Americas and Caribbean in 1492.

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22.02.2019 | by Oliver Milman

Luta ca caba inda: from archive to fragment

Luta ca caba inda: from archive to fragment  The book condenses some important aspects of the project. Its authors are not made explicit, pointing to the collaborative nature of this effort of rescue and rereading. But it also ends up suggesting that this living process of documenting complicates the very notion of authorship as a sovereign gesture with the authority to determine how images are exposed (or concealed), or to guide interpretation and impose meaning.

Afroscreen

12.02.2019 | by Miguel Cardina

Interwinings: peripheral arts, artivism and post-memory

Interwinings: peripheral arts, artivism and post-memory The neologism “artivism” was coined in the 1960s to describe demonstrations against the Vietnam War, as well as student movements and counter-culture. The situationist Guy Debord theorized this conjuncture in his book “The Society of the Spectacle” (1967), in which he argued that it was necessary to overcome existing modes of politics and art, to sabotage the demands of capitalism and to find new modes of art and life. The term reappeared only in the mid-1990s, with the internet revolution, as part of a critical lexicon to describe not only the practice of political art, but also to interrogate what counted as politics and art. In that context, the fundamental question was the transformation of capital into a spectacle, and subsequent artistic problematics.

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12.02.2019 | by Fernanda Vilar

Thank you, Mamadou Ba!

Thank you, Mamadou Ba! These latest events strip bare the racist system in which we live, enforced by the police and through normalised acts of violence against black people of all ages and sexes, and with the continued impunity of those responsible, reaching a level that can no longer be tolerated.

Mukanda

25.01.2019 | by vários

(RE)MEMBERING / (FOR)GETTING by Rita GT

(RE)MEMBERING / (FOR)GETTING by Rita GT No centro de todos os poderes imperialistas, Portugal incluído, existiu sempre uma incrível habilidade para esquecer, uma fábrica incrível de esquecimento. A tarefa dos artistas, escritores e pensadores é de analisar este processo de ‘lembrar e esquecer’.

I'll visit

23.01.2019 | by George Shire

“Africa is the last frontier of capitalism”, interview with Achille Mbembe

“Africa is the last frontier of capitalism”, interview with Achille Mbembe Movement is at the core of life, not necessarily space. If it is translated into space, this is done by means of space being perceived as movement. Therefore, we are facing two completely opposing philosophies. From this point of view, the African movement philosophy, the pre-colonial one, is similar to a rationale specific to the digital world, according to which, fundamentally, one seeks to create connectivity, using networks, instead of tracing categories, classifying, establishing hierarchies and limiting movement.

Face to face

21.01.2019 | by António Guerreiro