Amílcar Cabral: journeys, memories, descolonization

Amílcar Cabral: journeys, memories, descolonization For many young people today, in Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Portugal, France, Brazil, the United States of America, Cabral represents the possibility of criticizing various forms of power, of resistance and of affirming their identities. The ways that Cabral has been taken up confirm that the originality of his praxis lies in its articulation of, and opposition to, different dimensions of domination and violence, from neo-colonialism to gender discrimination.

To read

04.08.2018 | by Sílvia Roque

“Discoveries” - colonialities of memory

“Discoveries” - colonialities of memory One of the most important discoveries to which the museum of the “Discoveries” could lead would, thus, be the perception that the uses of language are not innocent and the grammar of memory has always much more to do with the present than with the past – the perception, in short, that, in the whole controversy, what is at stake is not simply what we were, but, rather, what we are and, above all, what we want to be.

To read

14.07.2018 | by António Sousa Ribeiro

The national meeting of veterans: "Perhaps during the ceremony we should only hear the bugles play"

The national meeting of veterans: "Perhaps during the ceremony we should only hear the bugles play" Now, forty-four years after the end of the War, for the former combatants who celebrate it in Belém, June 10 is, above all, a day when those who once fought together in Africa pay tribute to their comrades who died there. This year the meeting was celebrated for the 25th time. The same format unfolded: interfaith ceremony; speeches; a message from the President (in the Azores for other celebrations); parades, a cortège and the laying of flowers. Adriano Moreira did not speak, but he was a guest of honour. This tribute to the war-dead stages the consensus on which the meeting itself has always relied.

To read

13.07.2018 | by Fátima da Cruz Rodrigues

Amílcar Cabral, the PAIGC and the Media: The Struggle in Words, Sounds and Images

Amílcar Cabral, the PAIGC and the Media: The Struggle in Words, Sounds and Images In addition to broadcasting Cabral’s speeches and talks, war communiqués and progress reports, the PAIGC anthem, interviews with soldiers, and the usual programmes, the Rádio Libertação studio fulfilled another role, as highlighted by Amélia Araújo. It made it possible to record the music of Guinea, capturing the music of most of the Guinean ethnic groups and disseminating it.

To read

03.07.2018 | by Teresa Duarte Martinho

Brussels' Lumumba Square: a site of controversy

Brussels' Lumumba Square: a site of controversy With what significance do local and national public authorities in today’s Europe now want to include another narrative, not just the colonial narrative, in their official discourse about the past? Such a desire is clear in moments such as the Brussels municipality’s unanimous decision about Lumumba Square. That is, who has the responsibility to decide about how memories of colonialism should be brought forward in a Europe that is itself the child of colonialism? In other words, what does it mean that voices and visions of Europeans of African descent are taken into account in discourses about colonial legacy by a Europe that has struggled to recognize its own traumas and blind-spots?

City

03.07.2018 | by Felipe Cammaert

Declaration of war 1

Declaration of war 1 I said to one of them, who was very injured, “The troops can’t do anything for you, what do you want before you die?” He asked for water, I told the soldier to fetch water but gave him a signal not to go, that it wouldn’t be necessary. I picked up an FBP submachine gun, which wasn’t reliable, and fired a shot to kill him, but he stepped to the side.

Mukanda

25.06.2018 | by Vasco Luís Curado

Which "legacies" are we taking about?

Which "legacies" are we taking about? Which colonial or imperial history are we talking about? What do we know about this past, whether distant or recent? What do we really know about such fundamental questions as occupational or income structures in former colonial societies, or patterns of consumption, degrees of literacy, cultural practices, ideological possibilities, levels of political education and participation, or citizenship and land policies, in the city, countryside or in between?

To read

02.06.2018 | by Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo

Behind the Scenes at the Museum

Behind the Scenes at the Museum The newly modernised Central African Museum at Teruvren does not do away with the old, nor does it resolve the question of what purpose an African museum serves in Europe, today. Instead, those visiting when it re-opens will be confronted with the uneasy relationship between past and present that Tervuren will always embody - and with the lingering presence of King Leopold's ghost.

I'll visit

26.05.2018 | by Ana Naomi de Sousa

Strength and power: reimagining revolution

Strength and power: reimagining revolution Politics isn’t, first and foremost, a matter of making allegations and raising awareness; there is no one straw that breaks the camel’s back, and what’s bad can be tolerated indefinitely. Instead, it is a sort of shedding of the skin, by which we become sensitive to this or allergic to that. Nor has it much to do with convincing (discourse), or seducing (marketing), but rather with opening all sorts of spaces to experience another way of living, another definition of reality, another vision of the world. In the struggle for hegemony, the skin – yours, mine, everyone’s – is the battlefield. JEUX SANS FRONTIÈRES #2

Games Without Borders

11.02.2018 | by Amador Fernández-Savater

A Revolutionary Lifeline: Teaching Fanon in a Postcolonial World

A Revolutionary Lifeline: Teaching Fanon in a Postcolonial World I want to first discuss the politics around teaching Fanon in today’s postcolonial world, and in particular in a post-Brexit Britain. What is it about Fanon that captures the hearts and minds of so many students, particularly students of colour? I then want to discuss the continuing debate around Fanon’s relationship to Marxism, looking at some of the ways in which Fanon’s work provides a refreshing lens on capitalism in the postcolonial world.

To read

20.08.2017 | by Sara Salem

Doc's Kingdom 2017 I Surfacing Trouble

Doc's Kingdom 2017 I Surfacing Trouble We would like to invite you on a journey. Not to cross the ocean but to plumb its surface. Forget the solid and luminous history of continents and their lighthouses that tear into the night with dazzling certitudes. Enter instead into the soft shadow of the depths, on the other side of the opaque mirror of water, into an endlessly changing landscape that ignores the old borders and bodily limits. Liquid movement of subversion, waves of voices as well as radio waves, telepathy. Space is the place. This is the place for no monuments other than the bones of those thrown overboard. Migrants whose only compass is despair, pregnant slave women who fertilize the ocean depths.

Afroscreen

20.08.2017 | by vários

Moving Image in Portuguese (Post-)Colonial Situation(s)

Moving Image in Portuguese (Post-)Colonial Situation(s) the aim of (Re)Imagining African Independence. Film, Visual Arts and Fall of Portuguese Empire is not to undertake an exhaustive survey and analysis of the filmic and audio-visual materials related to the Portuguese post-colonial situation. This collection of essays proposes, more modestly, and first of all, to contribute to a better knowledge of political propaganda films shot during and straight after the liberation wars. Shot by African and foreign filmmakers in different contexts and according to different agendas, these films allow us to explore such diverse questions as how the liberation struggles and Portuguese colonialism were envisaged according to opposing cold-war and geopolitical rhetorics, or how the newly independent countries imagined themselves as nations.

Afroscreen

10.07.2017 | by Maria do Carmo Piçarra and Teresa Castro

On "Learning to live with the enemy", by Pedro Neves Marques

On "Learning to live with the enemy", by Pedro Neves Marques Permanecemos incapazes de escutar e compreender o diálogo entre uma androide ameríndia e o milho transgénico – a quem pertence a humanidade, afinal de contas? Para a coexistência destas diferentes cosmologias – modernas, animistas ou tecnofílicas – não existe sonho ou ficção capaz de as apreender num todo, apenas a perceção de que o mundo lhes dá lugar incessantemente e que a posição de inimigo, mais do que a natureza ou a cultura, marca as suas fronteiras.

I'll visit

10.07.2017 | by Pedro Lapa

Panoramic in Moving Fragments, or Mónica de Miranda’s Twin Visions of (Un)Belonging

Panoramic in Moving Fragments, or Mónica de Miranda’s Twin Visions of (Un)Belonging Miranda’s work is deeply marked by family memories and experiences and, more broadly, by the collective histories of Portugal and Angola. In Panorama, her focus on the psychic and physical remnants of several pasts – colonial, post-independence, post-Cold War, post-civil war – within natural, urban and architectural landscapes of Luanda and beyond serves the larger purpose of examining the contradictions of the present and imagining alternative futures.

I'll visit

05.07.2017 | by Ana Balona de Oliveira

"‘Theory’ is not just words on a page. It’s also things that are made": interview with Nicholas Mirzoeff

"‘Theory’ is not just words on a page. It’s also things that are made": interview with Nicholas Mirzoeff In Europe and the United States, there is also the specific return to colonial form and nostalgia. In Portugal, I’ve been struck by the visible presence of what are still referred to as the “explorers” or the “discoveries,” rather than “colonizers” and “encounter.” The depiction of African bodies in official art and monuments is often stereotyped, almost degrading. I don’t see this, unfortunately, as an exception but as an example of the new divisions. Universities set a poor example here, with minorities and people of color being systematically underrepresented on both sides of the Atlantic.

Face to face

27.06.2017 | by Inês Beleza Barreiros

What a new university in Africa is doing to decolonise social sciences

What a new university in Africa is doing to decolonise social sciences Part of our task is to build a canon, knowledge, and a way of knowing. This is happening against the backdrop of a movement by South African students to decolonise their universities; Black Lives Matter protests in the United States; and in the context of a much deeper history of national reimagination across Africa and the world.With this history in mind our faculty is working towards what we consider a decolonial social science curriculum. We’ve adopted seven commitments to help us meet this goal, and which we hope will shift educational discourse in a more equitable and representative direction.

Mukanda

15.06.2017 | by Jess Auerbach

Looking After Freedom?

Looking After Freedom? The idea of freedom as a point of arrival – an accomplishment that lies behind us, materialized and monumentalized; freedom as a ballot, a single gesture hinged to a turning point; freedom carved in stone, set on a hill, allegorized in a recognizable form; freedom as a lofty place we ascend to, is one that can be counterpoised to freedom as departure, as work and process; an immaterial, contingent ideal; an ambition and responsibility which escapes and evades one’s grasp, but to which one continuously commits.

I'll visit

08.06.2017 | by Nancy Dantas

Decolonising the curriculum in SOAS, World Philosophies

Decolonising the curriculum in SOAS, World Philosophies Philosophy students should be encouraged to engage with the challenging work of thinkers like Kwami Anthony Appiah, Franz Fanon, Achille Mbembe, Valentin-Yves Mudimbe, Enrique Dussell and Walter Mignolo just as they do with Parfit and Strawson. Should we not all be in the business of engaging, to quote Nietzsche, with 'what may be thought against our thought'?

Mukanda

04.04.2017 | by World Philosophies

Duplo vê

Duplo vê Duplo vê*, is at once, the name for the letter W in Portuguese (inspired by the title W ou les souvenirs d’enfance by George Perec) and also the “double sight” of a cross-eyed God. Duplo vê could have a subtitle: essay on the strabismus of God.

Mukanda

17.02.2017 | by Mattia Denisse

"We are all postcolonial"

"We are all postcolonial" Our duty, as creative people, to paraphrase the late Nina Simone, should always be to reflect the times we live in. We do this also by challenging constructions of history that have and continue to favour the powerful as we fight for the future we want to see and experience in the world, beyond our own physical existences.

Face to face

31.01.2017 | by Gabi Ngcobo and Katerina Valdivia Bruch