Panoramic in Moving Fragments, or Mónica de Miranda’s Twin Visions of (Un)Belonging

Panoramic in Moving Fragments, or Mónica de Miranda’s Twin Visions of (Un)Belonging Miranda’s work is deeply marked by family memories and experiences and, more broadly, by the collective histories of Portugal and Angola. In Panorama, her focus on the psychic and physical remnants of several pasts – colonial, post-independence, post-Cold War, post-civil war – within natural, urban and architectural landscapes of Luanda and beyond serves the larger purpose of examining the contradictions of the present and imagining alternative futures.

I'll visit

05.07.2017 | by Ana Balona de Oliveira

An interview with the Zimbabwean gallerist Jimmy Saruchera

An interview with the Zimbabwean gallerist Jimmy Saruchera For other mediums such as sound art and video art to gain traction in Afrika, I think they need to be taken out of the gallery or museum environment and put into the mobile environment where people are. This entails modifying the model of collecting, where alternative commercial models better suited to mobile consumption of content come to the fore. The onus is on these new art platforms in Afrika to look deep within their cultures and societies and innovate the mediums themselves to make art more relevant for their communities.

I'll visit

14.10.2015 | by Inês Valle

The Current Situation (2015)

The Current Situation (2015) The current situation tells us in what way we should create empathy with the images of the world. Or how the images of the world are themselves empathy, understanding. An abstract economical system that obsessively copies the natural chaos. Distribution, or relationship. The act of transaction and of eternal and permanent conflict.

Mukanda

27.04.2015 | by Pedro Barateiro

Ângela Ferreira Monuments in Reverse

Ângela Ferreira Monuments in Reverse The solo exhibition ‘Monuments in Reverse’ gathers for the first time a set of works by Ângela Ferreira, made between 2008 and 2012, which emerged from the same research-based processes, giving rise, however, to disparate installations whose intimate relationships tend to remain unexplored from a curatorial perspective. With the aim of opening a space of visibility for the conceptual and formal interstices sustaining her practice in general and these works in particular, the exhibition is purposefully documentary and process-based. It intends to shed light on thinking processes more than points of arrival, through the possibility of new connections, or the visibility of previously occluded ones, the strong presence of drawing and video, and the dialogue with works by others which have constituted point of departure or inspiration.

To read

07.01.2015 | by Ana Balona de Oliveira

A city called mirage by Kiluanji Kia Henda

A city called mirage by Kiluanji Kia Henda A City Called Mirage is a complex exhibition, by the Angolan artist KILUANJI KIA HENDA (Luanda, 1979), which explores original approaches to a recurring theme in recent times: that of cities between the states of virtuality and desertification. Kiluanji uses (science and mythological) fiction and irony as ways of transcending the pessimism of hyper-criticism and the aesthetics of the ruin. Through humour we are made aware of just how ephemeral the largest human constructions are: all cities will be reduced to raw materials again, just like the metals removed from the ground will once again merge back into it.

City

03.10.2014 | by Lucas Parente

The third man argument

The third man argument We asked an albino guy if he could tell any jokes about the Portuguese, he laughed and said, a Portuguese man arrived here in Maputo, couldn’t believe his eyes, and asked a smart and friendly looking native what they called motherfuckers in Mozambique. But sir, we don’t call them, they come from Lisbon of their own accord. And there we were, two motherfuckers in Maputo, 38 years after independence and 20 years after the civil war, the old drunk woman shouting, her eyes irradiating blood and misery, give me a mulatto, give me a mulatto or money, motherfucker.

To read

24.04.2013 | by João Maria Gusmao + Pedro Paiva

Risking what opens the way, interview with António Pinto Ribeiro

Risking what opens the way, interview with António Pinto Ribeiro A particular cultural expression results from an expectation that a group has in relation to the culture and the world, but also in its hereditary burden, in what, in the English-speaking world, is well called heritage. Of course, because of tradition or expectation, many of these cultures and groups come into conflict. It may be productive, since it is assumed as a normal part of democracy. As there is negotiation between groups and cultural expressions, where the intervention in the city and political and social issues cannot be replaced by culture, we find ourselves in a rich and democratic situation. Cultural productions should translate that.

Face to face

06.10.2011 | by Marta Lança

African Modernity from Johannesburg: William Kentridge's Other Faces

African Modernity from Johannesburg: William Kentridge's Other Faces If any African artist working today can be described as internationally acclaimed, instantly recognizable, with a style marked by a unique personality, it is the South African William Kentridge. A ubiquitous presence in art festivals and exhibitions and in the permanent collections of the great museums, a recipient of numerous prizes, encomia, and honorary doctorates, Kentridge was born in Johannesburg in 1955, when popular uprisings and increasingly harsh repression drew clear lines between partisans and opponents of the racist authoritarian regime.

I'll visit

21.06.2011 | by Beatriz Leal Riesco

The arts have arrived in some parts of Africa, but it took such a long time

The arts have arrived in some parts of Africa, but it took such a long time Since the 1960s, there has been great excitement in many African countries with the creation of art schools. Together with the first exhibitions of self-taught artists, there have also been the first festivals of black art, and even the work of African photographers has begun to establish a reputation for itself in Africa, in European countries and in some forums in the USA. The history of these artistic movements is already being written, describing their schools, their leading figures and their international impact.

To read

11.05.2011 | by António Pinto Ribeiro

Species of Spaces: Places, non-places and spaces of identity in the video work of Ângela Ferreira

Species of Spaces: Places, non-places and spaces of identity in the video work of Ângela Ferreira There is something transversal in Ângela Ferreira's video work, something that deals, fundamentally, with a kind of non-correlation between the concrete identity of the filmed places and its investment in open juxtapositions over a constellation of spacial axes and discontinuous temporalities. If territorial duality, inseparable from a certain biographical trajectory, from frequent journeys between Africa - Mozambique and South Africa - and Europe, undoubtedly marks Ângela Ferreira's work, it is precisely this territorial duality that has written history in the indeterminate space of video discourse, pointing to issues of geopolitics and exposing us, simultaneously, to the work of deconstruction of iconography and the colonial and postcolonial imaginary that is being systematically developed by the artist.

Afroscreen

13.09.2010 | by Raquel Schefer