The forgotten origins of “Women’s Rights are Human Rights”

The forgotten origins of “Women’s Rights are Human Rights” The long history of advocacy around “women’s rights are human rights” features activists from the Global South and women of color in the US. For instance, in 1945, at the founding of the United Nations, Latin American feminists played a critical role in trying to advance “women’s rights” into the category of human rights. And after World War II, when the US Black freedom movement often deployed human rights arguments, Pauli Murray, the attorney, feminist, and civil rights advocate, argued specifically that “women’s rights are a part of human rights.” What changed at the end of the 20th century was that a far-reaching and expanding global feminist movement began to collectively use the idea that “women’s rights are human rights” to advocate for change at the United Nations and beyond.

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08.10.2021 | by Lisa Levenstein

The populist far-right and the intersection of anti- immigration and antifeminist agendas: the Portuguese case

The populist far-right and the intersection of anti- immigration and antifeminist agendas: the Portuguese case This article demonstrates that antifeminist agendas (often labelled as anti-gender ideology by proponents) are key to understand how ethnonationalist, xenophobic and racist discourses are forwarded by far-right parties in Portugal and across Europe. Therefore, it focuses on the intersections between antifeminism, including femonationalism, and anti-immigration agendas, examining how gendered and racialized tropes are used in conjunction in far-right propaganda.

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19.05.2021 | by Rita Santos and Sílvia Roque

“Slags” face to face: an invitation to sit and talk

“Slags” face to face: an invitation to sit and talk We have a lot in common, much more than “having shared the same kind of love”. In what concerns the rights of women, we have an oppression and social injustice past and present in common. We are both oppressed in the sense that we don’t have the power of decision over our own bodies; we cannot decide whether to get out of an exploitative relationship or not because society, family, church, culture, traditions will tell you that you need to put up with it and stop “rebelling”.

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04.12.2018 | by Leopoldina Fekayamãle

Feminism and Africa: Impact and Limits of the Metaphysics of Gender

Feminism and Africa: Impact and Limits of the Metaphysics of Gender For the most part, prevailing definitions of gender in African studies have come from disciplines located within the Western body of knowledge. Scholars are often unaware how much these definitions are steeped in the mores and norms of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and the social conventions of European and European American cultures.

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01.11.2011 | by Nkiru Nzegwu