"The Alcântara Family" –The Saga of a Black Film Production in Brazil

"The Alcântara Family" –The Saga of a Black Film Production in Brazil I began to feel the painful lack of African history in my curriculum and the absence of Afro-Brazilians amongst my college peers. The way blacks were represented (or absent from) the media had bothered me since I was a child. Now, as a film producer, it made me even more uncomfortable. To escape this dilemma, I felt I had to follow my dream of making my own films, but where to begin?

Afroscreen

14.04.2010 | by Lilian Solá Santiago

Dakar's Cine-suburb: Young people create a cine-club in Pikine.

Dakar's Cine-suburb: Young people create a cine-club in Pikine. Dakar became overpopulated towards the beginning of the fifties. A displacement of families away from the inner city neighbourhoods was decided by the colonial state: they were truly "evictions" framed within urban planning projects. The Pikine department was created, regrouping "all of Dakar's excluded". Today it accounts for about one million persons: there is talk about "Pikine-Peking".

Afroscreen

14.04.2010 | by Rosa Spaliviero

Lily on the beach

Lily goes to church and prays a lot, but she is always wondering when this “f…” Jesus will come and finally knock on her door, toc, toc, toc…

Mukanda

12.04.2010 | by Barthélémy Toguo

City or Desert?

City or Desert? To western architects such as me, who have been developing their work as project designers or researchers in Angola, the issue that strikes us the most is the apparent conflict opposing Luanda to the rest of the Angolan territory.

Ruy Duarte de Carvalho

12.04.2010 | by Cristina Salvador

Kiluanji Kia Henda’s rampancy – from the Triennial of Guangzhou to Experimenta Design: two projects

Kiluanji Kia Henda’s rampancy – from the Triennial of Guangzhou to Experimenta Design: two projects  Kiluanji Kia Henda has displayed his art internationally – from Guangzhou to Cape Town, from Nairobi to Venice – which decouples his work from the exclusive legitimacy granted by Western contemporary art capitals. Another unique trait of his trajectory is that so far, his work has not been presented and sanctioned by the “small” world of its former “metropole”, Lisbon. As an Angolan artist, and therefore, from an independent country today and once a Portuguese colony, his art world’s has been extraneous to a set of cultural policies that take Portuguese-as-connection, and which rely on a closed circuit showcasing of art and its artists, traveling between ex-colonies and the ex-metropole.

Face to face

12.04.2010 | by Marta Mestre